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20100901
20100930
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, not a run. i'm not getting on the train to da if there's running. >> there will be no running from us. we got a golf cart. i got, like, those tony soprano sweats, velour and we'll be smoking. we're in new york, we have msnbc and "time" magazine analyst laura halprin. chris jansing and in washington, d.c., nbc political analyst pat buchanan. i don't know if pat is lathered up by what happened last night. pat, we'll get to you in a minute. i was awakened though in the middle of the night by a three-alarm -- not tweet, a three-alarm column by mark halprin, framing last night in opinion pox lip tick terms for the republican party. >> so apocalyptic. republicans were taking a senate seat, there was a building block to get back to the senate majority. it's gone barring some truly unforeseeable development. absolute binary switch. republicans now almost impossible to come up with a way they get the ten-seat majority. in the longer term it shows the republican party has a huge problem. they've benefit friday the tea party movement so far. they'll benefit in november but maybe having a huge, huge
'll read your-mails during mfrp news you can't use" on "morning joe" which starts right now. >>> i don't think health care is driving this election, david. i think economy is driving this election. people have anxiety about that economy. i'll tell you what -- >> then why did you do health care and spend so much of last year on health care? >> they don't want -- well, you know why we worked on health care? because health care was a huge -- is and was a huge problem in this country. >> yet democrats are not campaigning on it because it's so polically toxic. you said that wouldn't be the case. you said it would get more popular, not less. >> i think that health care overtime is going to become more popular. >>> welcome to "morning joe." happy monday. mika, that's what i keep thinking about myself. >> what this. >> that one day, one day i'm going to get more popular. my mom tells me. >> you're so popular. you're the most popular boy in school. >> no, my mom says i'm not because they're jealous of me. one day, like health care reform -- >> 21st century is only 10% over. >> that's right, tha
about jimmy carter that seems to emerge every few years that explain to us why he was beaten so soundly in 1980? >> well, he feels, i think it's safe to say, unappreciat unappreciated -- not underappreciated, unappreciated. as we all know, you don't get to be president by having a deficit of grandosty. right, that's not a qualification for the job. all of these guys have that to some degree or another. some hide it better than others. i think as president carter gets older, he hides it not at all. >> so you're saying, not as as well as others? >> not at all. >> let's put the whole story aut there, for what it's worth. by the way, in washington this morning -- >> begins in plains. >> we have with us, a proposal historian, michael. he said, basically, after these comments aired yesterday, because, you know, president carter is on a media blitz for his book, "white house diary." he says this, what i meant was for 27 years, any carter center has provided me with superior opportunities to do good. >> if we can just say, that is the worst clarification -- >> i'm not going to defend that argum
word. >> one we should all use today. >> like turning starbucks products into gold. >> or sand. >> i think it is. another great story from the west coast we will be talking about in a little bit. bill clinton, somehow managing to get right smack-dab in the middle of that california gubernatorial campaign. he's not even trying. this guy, jerry brown and bill clinton, these guys just hate each other and impacting that race. >> here's my guess, although bill clinton is now in the middle of that race spiritually, my guess is physically, corporately, he may not be at jerry brown's side campaigning on his behalf before november 2nd. >> jerry brown, i forgot this, he refused to endorse bill clinton in 1992, after clinton had locked down the nomination. >> it's true. >> jerry brown, the first guy to bring up whitewater. jerry brown, a guy that bill clinton, just to set the back story, remember the '92 debate, where clinton gets read -- how dare you attack my wife? before we get to the news. >> it's primary day -- >> hold on. i got you guys some gifts, really quickly. >> oh. >> tuscaloosa. th
meetings, town hall meetings and a lady asked a couple of tough questions. one was tell us about your faith. the other was will you eat one of my husband's red hot chilli peppers. >> i think he's been trying to do what we've been talking about which is connect and on different levels where there are questions, he's going there. that connection with the woman on the economy the other day, still sort of reverberates today because it was a seminal moment for this president and this country in terms of how people feel. he's putting himself out there. i commend him for it. i think it's hard for him. >> i think it's very hard for him. you can tell with him answering that question. >> i read the "times" story. as a guy who grew up in a southern baptist church. my parents took me there in the morning. they made me go to training union at night even when the super bowl was on. we were there wednesday night. we were there friday night. i grew up in an evangelical culture. i see you smirking wondering what happened to me. so i look through that statement, and when he says things like, jesus died for m
. >> young people have access to all technology. and they have the ability, unlike us, to use it. they know intuitively how to use these things. they don't have the ethics developed in life to understand -- obviously it's an extreme case of right and wrong. >> they can't figure out what strikes these kids as a prank ends up being something that costs a live. >> so ease sy to do. >> what is the nerve that hit everybody and us that made us say, that is the saddest thing? what is it here that is getting to us so much. >> i don't know. i think the kid -- >> the kid, kind of awkward, quiet sort of kid. >> played the violin. >> i also think he was struggling with his sexuality. it was a leap for him to do what he was doing in privacy and then to have it broadcast -- >> it's a type of bullying. >> which is so prevalent today. >> it went from zero to 200 miles an hour he was bullied and brought down by his own fears because they were plastered across the internet for everybody that he knows who is important to him to see. it's unbelievably cruel. >> probably including a lot of people who had no ide
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6